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  • Writer's pictureHall of Gains and Hypertrophy Podcast

HGH #21 - Hypertrophy 102



00:00.00

christophknoll

Welcome back everybody we got a brand new episode for you guys today. Unfortunately, it is just me Paul today I mean Chris off scheduled to not align well this weekend coming up I'll be gone all weekend from Saturday morning to pretty much Sunday night so wanted to get this done early so that we can edit the video. We can edit the audio all of that and get it out for you guys as usual on Sunday ah, but unfortunately our schedules during the week didn't really line up either for us to record another session with our schedules christoph and I are very busy guys. So it's hard for us to even record 1 episode a week let alone um, have the time to edit it. You know edit the audio video and then also um even have like a few lined up because most podcasts will have 3 or 4 episodes scheduled to post. Um, so we don't really have the time for that and at the same time. We also want to post fresh content each week that is also up to date. Um, maybe down the road. We might record an episode where if we don't have any content to talk about. We'll post it or whatever. Um, but for us, it's it's a lot of like very current information that we want to be ah presenting to you guys? Ah, you know whether that's something that Chris Bumpstead posted this week or something that some new scientific study that came out. You know, whatever it is. We want to be able to use that information for the podcast episode when we go to record it for that Sunday we don't want to have you know, outdated information being presented a month out and you know imagine if we were talking about posting video on on Chris's you know Chris Bumsted's Instagram you know and then we post that video a month later

01:32.17

christophknoll

Or that podcast a month later you guys wouldn't necessarily know exactly what we're talking about because it's not so fresh. So that's why we try to keep it to actually recording and editing and posting in the same weekend. So that's all fresh information. But with that being said I figured today good to just take a you know fun hour and just kind of shoot the shit a little bit. And kind of talk about the different kinds of hypertrophy and yes I did say that different kinds of hypertrophy something that um st and I talk about a lot is hyperford pertrophy. It's I mean it's in our damn name all of gains and hypererphy. But um, something that we also don't mention a lot is that there are multiple versions of hypertrophy. There's essentially 2 kinds. Myop fibriular myop fibrier. However, you want to say it and saroplasmic. Ah so we're going to be kind of discussing that today because there is differences between the 2 there's pros and cons to both. But there's also going to be ah, a clear distinct winner between the 2 and it comes to bodybuiling. So. Ah, we're going to be talking about that today as well as kind of diving more into biomechanics and a little bit of science-based workouts that I think are kind of getting overboard. Ah because you know social media goes in in shifts you know goes in waves. There's trends. There's you know what's hot now there's new topics to talk about. And a trend right now within social media is sciencebased workouts. Um, you know a year ago it was very much like lift as heavy as possible and lift as hard as possible and lift as much as you can and just go hard into the gym every single day but now it's all.

03:03.80

christophknoll

We're going to take a step back and we're going to focus on biomechanics and science and making sure we're hitting the right rep ranges and rest and all of that you know it's less about hitting it hard and it's more about doing everything that's by the book and I think that there's going hard in the gym and then also doing it by the book. Both have their uses. And there's both information to be gathered from both Ah you know going hard is just a mindset really but science-based workouts they have a place but I think that you can also overdo it as well. You know you don't want to get too technical with everything. It's like your food you don't want to be get you want to get too technical with your food. If you go overboard with your food as far as like how specific it is then you're you're kind of just messing with your brain at that point you know I've seen guys who are like ah oh ask me questions on Instagram somebody's like how much how many grimes of protein. Do you take and they're like 320.35 and it's like stop dude. Like really 320.35 yeah that it's so it's just on. It's unreasonable. It just doesn't make any like it could be like what's ideal in quotations but like at the same time you know it might not be you. You might not even hit that like sometimes I'll be cutting up chicken. And I'll get like six point zero five ounces like good enough you know I'm not going to go try to get the point zero five ounces out of there. It's close enough and who knows how much weight I'm going to lose for microwaving it or whatever it is. You know? So I'm just like whatever good enough. Um, and protein intake is pretty much on point with that.

04:34.10

christophknoll

But it's like why are you being so particularly specific and there's so many variables when it comes to training when it comes to food that you know being that specific is very very difficult. Ah because you know if you're going to cook your food a different way. It's going to come out a different way. It's the protein content's going to change a little bit differently. Ah you cook. Even you cook a rice if you cook a rice with more water. It's going to be more water is going to be observed. So if you go by weight or even size like is in cups then your rice is going to have a different carbon intake because the the kernels are going to be so they're going to be larger. They're going to have more water in them. Ah if you also rinse if you decide to rinse your rice first. And get all those starches out of there. Ah you know the whatever it is that coding the white coding on it then that's going to affect the the carbon take as well. So you know there's so many different variables like going to everything with training and food and posing and all of that that you know being so particular on everything is just a little bit overboard. Um, you know so we're going to be going over the training side of things today. Ah just because food is so so individual so particular per person that it's not really going to matter what I say for carbs or protein because for what for what works for me is going to vary drastically. When it comes to training. You know you can you can kind of take other people's workouts and kind of adapt to them and maybe change them out a little bit but it's not like what I do in the gym is going to be completely useless to you where my food could be completely useless to you and you can actually respond negatively That's not necessarily how the gym works.

06:05.90

christophknoll

If you took my workout. You might not have the best results but doesn't mean that it's going to negatively affect you. You could you know in a sense. It could negatively affect you because you could be getting better gains with something else. Ah but it's not going to be like you're on I take a step back because you're doing what I do so that's kind of we're going to talk about today. I'm not going to really talk about too much about what I do just going to talk about. Different kinds of hypertrophy and examples of them when it comes to bodybuilders and famous bodybuilders even at that so we'll dive into it today and then I'll be talking more about the biomechanics towards the end of the session I don't have anything written down on have anything up. Don't really have any articles. Just going to go off based off of this general knowledge of ah the different type of hypertrophies and also biomechanics as well. It's pretty easy to distinct the 2 ah hypertrophies and also but biomechanics is entirely just understanding how the human body works. So. Um, don't really need a scientific study to talk about biomechanics when it comes to training but with that being said, the 2 types of hypertrophy is myo fibar and saroplasmic and what it comes down to is really high intensity versus high volume which we've talked about before we've talked about high intensity versus high volume. But if you want to take a look at. Scientific approach to hypertrophy. It's myfabriular and sarcoplasmic myop fibriller is the high intensity side of things. It's going to be the low reps heavyweight longer rest period lifting. So that's going to be very influenced by someone like Ronnie Coleman Ronie Coleman did have his high rep sets.

07:39.10

christophknoll

But he's also known for his very low rep sets his very heavy workouts. Ah you know some of his heaviest or most popular video arguably is going to be his squat video. He does you know £800 squat for 2 reps and you know typically speaking people don't really build muscle off of that. But. Ronnie had a background already in power lifting and a lot of bodybuilders do have a background in power liftfting because powerlifting is kind of the foundation of in quotations ego right? So when you're in the gym strength is especially for guys plays a big role in your ego and if you leave your ego at the door. You're going to experience more gains but when it comes to powerlifting. A lot of guys get into powerlifting and olympic lifting for that matter because of ego and they want to be the strongest guy around they want to be the strongest they possibly can be so a lot of guys start with powerlifting because that's what interests them and then they kind of make their branch into bodybuilding but what usually ends up happening is either. They lose interest in but in powerlifting entirely. Or they're convinced so heavily that could they could be good in bodybuilding that they transition from but power liftfting to bodybuilding um, which I know a couple of guys off my top my head that were like that you know they just built crazy muscle from bodybuilding and look really really good. On top of also being strong so you know they were influenced to move to bodybuiling by a coach or by a friend or something like that and you know one guy off top my head he's pro now in classic physique and moving up to actually men super heavyweight because he's just that fucking massive. So ryany coleman is a good example of that he was a pyrolier long before he ever became a bodybuilder.

09:08.72

christophknoll

And he really became a bodybuilder like in his mid to late twenty s ah so you know everybody judging their you know gains and stuff like that off of their age. Give it time you know because when you're under 25 even your body's still growing. You're not really building super dense muscle yet and your body is not necessarily at its peak. For male human body right? Our peak are on 30 years old and that's when we really start building on dense fucking muscle Chris Baumstead ah he had a phenomenal physique. Don't get me wrong, but he really came into his physique later twenty s really I think he's like Twenty Eight Twenty Nine something like that now maybe even 30 and that's when he really came into his physique was the past like. 2 maybe 3 years but he's been competing in classic I think at the olympia since like 2017 or something but he really became good 2020 and so he's really on. He's been on this high of winning. You know he's been the king for really only two or three years ultimately and that's just because of his age. You know that plays a big role. Ah, as far as how your body builds muscle and you talk to anybody you know, 25 and up is really when guys start to fill out more especially in the gym. Ah your muscles start to develop a bit better your muscle insurers insertion start to improve your your muscle gets denser much much denser as you get older so that plays a big role and Ryan Coleman is no exception to that I mean he I don't even think he've won his first o limby till he was like 30 3 34 some shit like that he was competing into his 40 s andm pretty sure. Um, so he is an example of my fibbler lifting. Ah my fibr hypertrophy where he did a lot of heavyweight a lot of lower reps.

10:41.39

christophknoll

Saroplasmic is quite the opposite. It's very high reps you know 8 to 14 reps very short resting a lot of sets and lighter weight and you know good examples of that would be like kigreen ah Jay Cutler dorian yates ah you know those guys all lifted very heavy. Like they lifted heavy but they also lifted very high reps and even kyi green his thing. It's kind jay cutler and kigreen are very similar in the way they lifted The only difference is is the number of reps so jay cutler he was the kind of the foundation for a lot lot of guys, especially older generations like ah gen x you know in their 40 s. 30 s even um, the 3 sets of 10 that's kind of started with jay cutler he kind of it didn't start with him but he kind of popularized it and ah you know the straight sets aren't ideal but that's what worked for jay cutler so that's what he kept doing kai. Does 3 sets of 20 reps for everything which are also not in quotations ideal. But that's what works for him. So you know he does a lot of raps a lot a lot of reps but very lightweight for kai 20 reps on everything he does is fucking ludicrous. That's so many reps and on top of that he's doing that for each of his movements. So. It's not like he does 20 on bench. You know, let's say two twenty five for 20 and then he goes up to three fifteen and only does 15 now he does 20 again. So muscle fatigue is very odd when it comes to straight sets because it kind of goes against the entire principle of muscle fatigue. That's why.

12:11.48

christophknoll

Rep ranges aren't even a thing is because you're based off the laws of thermodynamics. You should not be able to lift the same exact. You should not be able to lift a heavier weight for the same number of reps if you went to failure on both sets and especially if they're close together with little rest. That's not how. Human body works. You would your muscles would fatigue at least a little bit and you'd get less reps with a heavier weight just how it works so straight sets are very interesting topic because they can work and when they when they work they really work. But if they don't work. They really don't work and for me straight successes don't work. I have to go through a rep range and mine is always 8 through 14 sometimes I'll do a warm up of more than 14 reps but almost never do I go below 8 unless it was an accident. Um, if I thought I was going to get more and I got less than 8 and then anything more than 14 was just really like I said just a warm up or like a stretch or something like that. So. Sarcoplasmic is really where bodybuilding plays its role or like kind of likes a stick. That's why you know we take amino acids like creatine glutamine um and protein and all of that is to help rebuild the sarcoplasmic effects of sarcoplasmic. Hypertrophy. So how it works is Marirubriller attacks the actual muscle fibers themselves so you do this by doing 5 to 8 reps per set roughly. You do about 2 to 4 minutes of rest give or take between sets and you go 80% and up of when you're.

13:48.55

christophknoll

You're one rep pr so what this looks like so let's say you're 1 rep pr or 1 rep max I mean on let's say deadlift is three fifteen so I'll pull out a calculator here just so I can do that math properly for you guys. Let's see so 3 hree fifteen times point 8 so 2 52 so your first set is essentially two hundred and fifty two pounds if your one rep max is three hundred and fifteen pounds um so for those of us that do high reps that sounds fucking ludicrous. You know if my one rep max is 3 15 I'm not going to be touching 54 probably that's just really really close to You're one rep max and if I'm going to be getting 8 reps that might be my top set 2 52 might be my top set. So my fial air kind of has a similar structure to pylifting ah as far as strength training goes pyralifting goes under 5 reps typically you go from you know 1 to 5 reps and you have closer to 5 minute ah rest periods of more like 3 to 5 minute maybe 4 to 6 minute versus 2 to four so mil fibr has a better place when it comes to muscle building ah than it does when it comes to powerlifting um in my opinion I think that you can, especially if you will stick to the closer side of like 2 minutes for rest. And go closer to 8 reps you know like 6 to 8 reps. Maybe you're going to have better results in muscle building most likely than you would in actual strength training. So the way it's structured typically um so with powerlifting they do mainly the 3 main movements which would be deadlift squat bench. That's what they focus on.

15:23.97

christophknoll

And the way they do it is they'd say let's say you start at seventy five or eighty percent your One Rep Max you then go up by 5% you go 8085? then you go 90 then 95, you go like Ninety Eight Ninety nine then 100% you want to write max and then from there you adjust your your reps accordingly. Um, you know your seventy five or eighty percent 1 rep max might be like. 5 reps and then you go like 8080 or 85% you go like 4 or 5 reps and then you go on so on and so forth up until 99% and 100% where you really just like do 1 rep and then depending on how you respond to those reps is whether or not you're going to go for a Pr and then when you do a Pr and you increase your pr. You adjust your weight accordingly. So let's say you have you know your 1 At Max was 3 15 then you like let's say you throw on a two and a half on each side. It becomes 23 so now your starting set at 80% is 350 £6 is no longer 352 so in a sense. It's kind of like progressive overload where. Adjust the weight in reps accordingly each set or each workout you're going to do based off of you know your top set essentially that's kind of what bodybuilders do we kind of base it off of our top set a lot of the time you know if top set becomes more like 10 reps and it's relatively easy 10 reps then we move up the weight so that we get closer to harder 8 reps. Ah. Parallels just kind of do the same thing. You know if they they're able to get a higher pr then everything else is hypothetically easier. So then they move up the weight you just keep moving it up moving it up moving it up and you keep increasing your pr overtime. It's small increments but in the long run that really adds up. Let's say you're adding you know you're adding that £5 to your Pr every week.

17:01.17

christophknoll

For a year that's two hundred and fifty pounds you're adding to your bench per year that wouldn't really actually happen. Even if you're on anabolics that's most I almost guarantee. That's not gonna happen and if that does happen your freak of fucking nature or you're starting out with a really lightweight. I could see someone going from one thirty five to 3 15 for 1 rep max in a year especially with Anabolics I can definitely see that happening but 3 15 to fucking like over £500 almost £600 I don't see that happening. Um, so if you do your freaking nature and you're probably layery wheels. Um. So with that being said, myer fibiler how that works is similar structure to powerlifting but they don't just do the 3 key movements. They also do they'd have like a back day and a chest day and a like day stuff like that and they would have a similar structure to the workouts when heading those movements you know 5 to 8 reps you know they might do like 4 or 5 sets. But it's ah it's based off the percentage of their pr. It might be like 8085 ninety and then maybe 95% um for their reps, whatever keeps them in that range of 5 to 8 reps and then you know time and the rest 2 to 4 minutes it might depend based off of you know the size of the muscle group that they're hitting you know chest might be a lower. Rest period then back shoulders might be like 2 minutes or legs is closer to 4 minutes you know I'm really not someone who's versed in my fibriller just because I don't see the value in it personally when it comes to muscle building I think thatiroplasmic has been proven time and time again to be much more effective but where my fibrier really takes place.

18:32.63

christophknoll

Is for those like I said that have power liftfting experience and built a lot of muscle based off powerlifting but also this is going to be a term that we've talked about before that I think is fucking insane is one sec. Yeah I'm from Massachusetts so I got my duncans here. So don't mind me um, is power builders.

18:52.80

christophknoll

That bullshit. So those guys who think that they can power lift and be strong but also look good at the same time and do both at the same time I think if you really want to be effective at either 1 either strength or looks you got to focus on it. It's like saying. oh like you're like a kid like oh I'm gonna learn how to write with both my right and left hand at the exact same time and then all of a sudden your handwriting a shit on both hands rather than having it good on 1 hand it just what's the point of being okay at 2 things if you could be amazing at 1 thing. You know so that's just my opinion if you want a power build and that's what makes you happy by all means do it. It's just to me I don't see the point if you're not gonna be the strongest guy in the room. You're not gonna be the best looking guy in the room. What's the point you know if you can't really compete in bodybuilding competitions because you're too wide. You know you got too wide of a waste because you're strong and you put on all this mass. And density so that you can lift heavy weight but then you can't lift up power lifting competitions because you're not strong enough because you're lean. You got a 6 pack or whatever and you know you're not putting on the weight the weight for your class in order to lift the weight that you need to lift in a sense. You know so like. You can't really compete in either 1 so to me, it's like what's the point I mean I'm very driven as far as like winning goes I'm very competitive person. Um, it's just part of who I am I've always been very competitive. So for me I just don't see the value in it.

20:21.20

christophknoll

But if that's what makes you happy you just like to train that way then by all means do that you know there's a couple of guys off my head off the top my head that are at the gym that do that and typically what I see with pybo there is they're more like on the older side. Maybe 40 s upper 30 s early 40 s and they don't have any plans of ever competing but they want to be strong and kind of look at at the same time. Ah. Just as like a dad essentially you know they want like the ideal like dad physique. You know so like that's what I see when it comes to power building. Ah, it's just to me you can you can specialize in power building Olympic lifting or bodybuilding and get better results. Because with power liftfting you focus on power liftfting stayed relatively lean. You can look good grant and you're not going to be like aesthetic like a bodybuilder would be but you can have ah you know you can have abs and you have a biascep mane or whatever and you know you can have some vascularity here and there but with bodybuilding you're not necessarily going to be super strong. But you're going to look really really? Well you're going to look really really good in the mirror and you're going to be aesthetic, especially if you stand on the leaner side. You know if you do like really really lean bulks and really lean cuts. Ah you can stay pretty lean year-round and look good. Ah Grandin. You're also not going to be the strongest muscle size does come with strength. You know it's not. Yeah, it's not like you gain size and you stay weak your whole life. You're going to gain strength as well. Ah, but you're not going to be as strong as you would be if you focused on pyrelifting I mean dudes who are my weight are lifting 3 4 times their body weight where I'm not even close to that. So it just depends on what your your focus is.

21:52.52

christophknoll

So My fibriller attacks the muscle fibers individually. Um and that's what you need to build back Up. It's just a muscle fibers. That's it. That's all we're really doing. You're not really depleting anything else. Sarcolasmic is way more focused on the glycogen storage around the muscles themselves. So. What this is going to mean is you're going to be affecting your Atp energy and also your creatine energy. Um, so you create That's why we take Creatine. That's why every bodybuilder on the planet recommends creating is because you're going to get more energy throughout the day. You're going to you' be able to go longer in your training Sessions. You're also going to hold on to a lot more strength because because you're supplementing creatine in when you're depleting it at your lift with your lifting. You're going to have better energy and better results Atp is not something that too many people talk about um it is affected when it comes to saroplasmic Hypertrophy. So. Um, let me look up the exact meaning um for atp because I always forget the acronym um to a dentist a a dentosinene triphosphte Denosine Triphyosphate Tri triphosphatete. Ah, it's an organic compound provides energy driven By. Um, many processes in living cells such as muscle contraction nerve impulse so on and so forth So Atp plays a huge role when it comes to energy same with creatine so you could supplement Atp in to help with that. It's not necessarily 100% needed because you do get it from your real food and you can supplement in energy with real food and carbs and all of that.

23:20.73

christophknoll

Caffeine even if you really wanted to go that route so sarcoplasmic the way it works is just like you'd expect for bodybuilding is ah 8 to 14 reps. Ah you know anywhere from like 30 seconds to maybe 90 seconds or how to 20 seconds of rest and then ah you know higher amount of sets. Typically you know 4 or 5 sets per movement sometimes even 6 depending on your structure. Um, that's sarcoplasmic for you. And this is all this is sciencebaseds. This is all statistics based you know they you know there's been a lot of studies done on the different types of hypertrophy the different types of lifting and see what the results are and basically what was derived from these statistics is anything more than 14 reps for your sets. Excuse me. This is my second I'm recording this because the audio is coming out of my camera like a couple episodes ago and sounded like shit and I was yawning like crazed. The first episode I don't know what the hell is wrong with me. So um, when it comes to saroplasmic and these studies that people found is that. Anything more than 14 reps is going to be kind of you're going to get diminishing returns. You're not going to get as much results out of it as you would be if you're going from 8 to 14 reps and same with the less than 8 reps when it comes to muscle building muscle size. Ah 8 to 14 reps is statistically the perfect spot to be.

24:39.30

christophknoll

Um, you know you might hear 8 to 12 reps from a lot of people who might see 10 to 14 but if you're in the 8 to 14 range then you're going to be getting the the ideally the maximum results you possibly can and then also another key component when it comes to sarcoplasma training is also timeline tension. Ah so. Timeow attentiontion. Really what you want to be doing ideally is almost lifting longer than you resting? Ah, especially with rep timing if you're going to be on the 14 rep side of things and you're doing Let's let's say you know we've always talked about it here time on detention. You want 3 second negative. 1 second positive and one second pause. So the 5 seconds per rep. So if you're doing 14 reps hypothetically speaking you should be hitting around ah like 70 seconds for your lift and then let's say you rest for 45 seconds you're lifting longer than you're actually resting. Ah, so that's kind of what circoplasmic is it's very depleting on the system and that's why it's very very hard to do to do sarcoplasmic training. It's something you have to adapt to just like power lifting I mean power lifting is very very hard. It's very depleting because it's explosive explosive energy 1 rep and you're fucking fried. So. It just depends on how you expend your energy. You talk to any power lifter or olympic lifter for that matter. They'll tell you that anything more than 5 reps feels like fucking cardio to them because it's so much energy expenditure over a period of time. They're not used to it. You know it feels like they're going for a run so you know.

26:11.10

christophknoll

The difference between power lifters and bodybuils like we've said is power liftft is try to get up as much weight as easy as possible. We try to get up as little weight as hard as possible. Ah because you don't want the weight to be taxing a new joints. You don't want to be taxing on shoulders elbows knees whatever it is. You don't want it to be affecting your forearm grip. You don't want it to be affecting. Any sort of attendons anything like that. So really, you want to be lifting the lightest way you can for your joints that also keeps you in that range of 8 to 14 reps for failure. So this is where you also need to leave ego at the door. You know if you if you got a training partner or something like that that is kind of pushing you and. You you want to feel stronger than them just don't do that just really focus on your rap ranges really focus on you know, making sure you're in that 8 to 14 rap range and then also focusing on your strengths and weaknesses when it comes to saroplasmic training myo fibriler like I said has its place seemosaroplasmic. But. Ah, when it comes to bodybuilding. It's all just sarcoplasmic. Ah so either way it's still hypertrophy. We're still talking about hypertrophy today. You're going to gain muscle size no matter how you train between these 2 you're going to gain muscle size. It just depends on what you're also valuing whether you value strength more or you don't value strength more so it's like either you want to go 100 % looks or you want to go like 60% looks 40% strength and that's kind of what power building is like in myophibular training and.

27:36.78

christophknoll

Sarroplasmic and what these studies also found was that you should go either 1 you know you don't want to do myo fibular and sarcroplasmic. You want to do either all myophibbuular or sarcoplasmic and don't really stretch into either 1 you don't want to ah to overlap at all. So it all just depends on what you're looking for and like I said Ronnie Coleman was a good example of. Ah, my fier Jay Cutler even Phil Heath um Kai Green Dorian Yates just all really really high volume lifters ah did a lot of reps a lot of sets and that's where they are today. But Ronnie Coleman is also unique situation too because. Lot of people associate the way he trained with his injuries and that's just not the reality. Ah, the reality is that his injuries came from surgeries and if you ever watch the king documentary. You should really really watch. It's a phenomenal documentary and it really makes you appreciate everything that Ronnie Coleman went through and really makes you respect him a lot more. On top of just the memes that are around right now. There's a lot of memesvolving in ronney but really at the end of the day he was the arguably the best bodybuilder of all time and he will be the best bodybuilder of all time for a very long time. So is it going to be It's going be a long time before anybody comes even close to his physique and I mean I was watching a video the other day. It was just him doing. Basically our front lat spread. Um and he just looked absolutely fucking. Insane granted he was close to a show. You could tell he was deathly in prep. Um, he looked depleted. He kind of had death face going on and he had striations in his chest and everything but like the sheer fucking size and you know, ah.

29:14.44

christophknoll

Aesthetics and on top of that his ability to become lean for every show is next to none I just wish my only critique I wish that could have been different was this is mid-check midsection. It's just the the the spread between his abs his left and right ab abdominal muscles. To me it just a little bit far but that's nothing you can help that's just genetics I just wish that it would be a little bit closer and then I would argue. He's the most aesthetic men's open bodybuilder of all time. Um a lot of people argue Flex Wheeler was the most aesthetic um, but that just comes on to personal preference I think flex really looked amazing. But I think that someone like I would much rather have like Derek Lusford his physique I think he has an amazing physique I love his look Regan Grimes also even though he doesn't have the size it is like or he has it now. He's working on it. But even though he didn't have the size I still think that he has 1 of the most aesthetic physiques on the stage. Ah, so Ronnie Coleman had pretty much the whole package minus his midsection in my opinion and he just looked absolutely insane and like I said the injuries didn't come from his lifting. It didn't come from. You know, dead lift or squatting or anything like that he did slip a disk. Deadlifting but anybody that can happen to anybody you can slip a dis fucking bending over to pick up something like you can slip a disk at any time it just for him. It was just when he was deadlifting and then he had to get surgery on it and it was just a never ending snowball of surgeries and it was very unfortunate because.

30:43.59

christophknoll

He is in a lot of pain now and he's with walk. He's in a walk like he uses walkers. Whatever and um, granting. He's still training so insane respect to him even training through this pain that he's in It's just constant pain. It's pretty much I'm pretty sure it's chronic at this point. It's just part of his life. The pain. Um. And you know he's still training early in the morning four thirty five o'clock in the morning he's still training and I can't even begin to understand how he does that. But um, the way it happened for him was just he had a surgery in his back to fix it when they had another surgery to fix how the first surgeon fucked up and then the third surgery to fix up the second one. Was just never ending surgeries to fix previous surgeries issues. Um, and it was just never ending circle so he just kept his backup getting more and more fucked up and it was not not his fault at all. He just lifted heavy and you know he slipped a disc and it was just the surgeries and you talked to him and he does not regret a single thing he would do it all over again. Given him with the pain he has today he would do it all over again and a lot of people say oh I wonder how would have been if he just trained this way or that way and it's you wouldn't have been the base he might have not have been the best in the world. You might not have been the best in history. We don't know where he would have been if you lifted differently alllthough we know is what actually happened and all these what fs aren't good for him. And it's not good for the industry. A lot of what ifs ah, just you got to you got to take your training in your your physique at face value and you got to improve upon it and Ronnie just lift the way that he always knew and he lifted the way that his body was responding to and he became the best in the world for eight consecutive years

32:18.95

christophknoll

Not consecutive 8 years in general um and he'll go down like I said is one of the best if not the best in history and you know it just sucks that he went through those surgeries because it's like anybody who's on a medication who's taking medications for side effects of other medications. It's never any circle and you're just eventually going to just end up with side effects. Anyways. So it just sucks that it wasn't his fault in a way I feel like um I think that people want to say it was his fault because they want they want to know that that can't happen to them but it could happen to anybody you slip a disc and you get bad surgeries done. It could happen to anybody. So. You know he's just human. He's human and the surgeries he had just kind of affected and affected him in that way. Um, but you also look at guys who lift sarcroplasmic style you know higher reps lower weight some of of them look amazing when they're retired some of whom don't look amazing I mean. Ah, you know Dorian Yates I would argue doesn't look the best for his age I think you can look better but I almost who the fuck am I to talk about that. You know I mean I think Jay Cutler looks fucking phenomenal for his age and he's still holding onto a massive amount of muscle. Um, you know I saw him in person a few years ago at the jy colorer classic and. Ah, Boston and he still looked fucking massive his arms are stretching out of his shirts and um, his fucking pants were stretched out because of his legs like he's still he's still big. Um, you know not to the degree. He was ah but he's still holding onto a lot of it and Kai Green is still enormous. You know he's been retired for quite some time now and he's.

33:51.25

christophknoll

He's still enormous. You know he's not old, but ah, you know he still really holds onto it. So um, you know each individual bodybuilder when they retire is going to look a little bit differently and whether or not the still train is up to them Dorian doesn't really train anymore. He does a lot of like Kettlebell Versussence band bullshit um and for me I just know that no matter what happens as long as I'm not literally like in like bedridden for the rest of my life or like paralyzed I'll still be lifting I'll still be training even when I retire whatever stop lifting or stop bodybuilding. You know I will always be training. It's a part of who I am. It's a part of a lot of us. It's a part of the lifestyle. It's just who we are and if it wasn't for the lifting if it wasn't for the posing even I wouldn't do any of this. You know what's the point you know why eat shitty food well that shitty food. Why eat bad tasting food all the time if I can't train you know what's the point I love to train I love to lift I love to lift weight I love to put my body through that I hate cardio. Granted but I love to lift and I love posing. So if it wasn't for those 2 things I wouldn't even considered competing you know the lifting is literally why I got into bodybuilding I started lifting at a gym and. Really as ah, ah, really, really liked it and wanted to take it further and taking it further just meant different food. That's really all I came down to um and you and that's where my knowledge sits excuse me for Lord like I start pausing the recordings. You guys aren't seeing that.

35:26.83

christophknoll

Um, so that's where my knowledge sits it doesn't really sit with food. It doesn't it doesn't I have surface knowledge of both food and drugs. It's really just anecdotal stuff honestly, um, rather than like actual true knowledge I mean you can truly take years and years to learn how to. Write a meal plan for someone I mean you can get your bachelor's even probably your I think you can get your master's nutrition in your doctorate I'm pretty sure and nutrition nutritionists. So you can study as long as you want on food and never learn everything about it when it comes to bodybuilding too. I mean you. A lot of when it comes to bodybuiling and being a bodybuilding coach comes from experience. So like you're going to be working with a coach for bodybuilding or powerlifting lifestyle whatever it is. They need to have either lived you know whatever they're teaching you or be curtly in it right now because if they're not then. But the fuck are they talking about if they've never competed before then how would they possibly know what a prep is unless they've been involved in the industry for so so long. You know if you're if you're like okay, for instance, um, you know I watch a lot of racing. So. I can tell you what a racing line is and you know why this racers better than the other and stuff like that. But I can't tell you how to drive the car. You know? Ah, but if you've been watching racing or like let's say you're in the paddock with the actual racers for 20 years you can probably teach a race or how to race even though you've never raced that car before. So.

36:53.97

christophknoll

You know, graded that is the the you know the exception here I think you know the exception kind of like that is like Chris acio um, he's been a bodybuilding coach for the longest time but I nobody has ever talked about his compete competitive career I'm not even sure if he's ever competed. Um. But he's had like Roney Coleman you know he was I'm pretty sure Ronnie Coleman's nutritionist and meal plan guy. So even though he's never from my knowledge competed doesn't necessarily mean he doesn't have the expertise to write these programs for people so that's a rare exception though. Most bodybuilding coaches should have at least competed before. Ideally have gone pro. Ah and also have had other pros under their ballot for coaching in order for you to be comfortable with them because it is harder to coach up an amateur than it is to coach up a pro. So with that being said, um. You know the the meals the food and all of that takes a lot more knowledge than training does training is not as much knowledge. But that's what we're kind of hoping this podcast is able to do for. You is to give you the knowledge necessary to write your own plans to do your own training I've been doing my own training for years now and you know I'll I'll send my weights and stuff like that to my coach every day. And I'll say hey you know what do you think of? this is this working or like do you think I should train something out. What do you think and you know he'll give me the green light but 99.9 percent of the time he never changes anything about my workouts. They're always approved by him. They're always good to him. Um, and that's just for my own knowledge. So you know I can write.

38:23.63

christophknoll

Trading programs all day long. Ah so that's what I'm kind of hoping this podcast is able to do for you guys is you know me and Chris off are able to ah provide you guys knowledge that we've both experienced you know anecdotal kind of stuff you know stuff that we've learned so that way you guys can apply that to your own. Selves you know without needed to necessarily a coach to write that for you. The food side of things we can talk about it. We can get basic knowledge but it's not something that we can necessarily say this is going to work. This isn't going to work because you know we're not experts in that field and I would never be able to pretend that I am you know I can write a basic meal plan like if my wife wanted to. You know, have me write a meal plan for her I can write a meal plan for her to be healthy, but it's not like I'm going to be dissecting. You know all of her hormone levels and you know how she's training or doing x y and z because I don't have the expertise with that but knowing. You know what she eats on a regular basis knowing her general life I could be like yeah so eat this and this and this and this and stay away from this and stuff like that. That's going to help you get to wherever you want to go with whatever it is so that's what I can do but I would never charge someone for that because I don't have the expertise to be like yeah my knowledge is worth money, especially with food. Training. Maybe especially when it comes to training in person. Um, but that's where a personal training comes into play I could definitely be a personal trainer I just personally I don't have my certification and I don't really I'm not really pushing to get it. It's just to me. It's like the experience is a lot more.

39:51.65

christophknoll

Valuable than the actual certification and there's plenty of person or trainers who have sort of certifications that I question what the fuck they're doing like just because you read out of a textbook doesn't necessarily mean you know how to train someone and the best trainers are the best lifters and the best trainers I've ever met. Have never gotten certified. They've been training people for ten plus years and they've never gotten certified in issues. They don't have any value in it. They don't find the value. They've already built up a client tell base and um, they have the expertise in it just from their own experience. So that's kind of where my experience lies. Ah. Christoph is really on the cusp of learning all of that which is great to see is great to see him learning. He's great to see him progressing and and kind of um you know blossoming essentially into the bodybuilder. He's becoming because you know we've him and I have known each other for a very long time and we've known each other before either of us even lifted and. Um, to kind of see him getting into it the past couple years and starting to progress and really progress and you can you could see it unfold and which is cool which is cool to see. It's not often. You get to see that. Ah so with that being said, you know we got about 20 minutes left to want to get into biomechanics and science-based training. So obviously we talked about myo fibriar and sarcoplasmic training styles for hypertrophy that is a science-based statistically based form of training. But that's not to say what movements you can and can't do and this is what I'm talking about when it comes to bio mechanics and science based training when I say science based I mean what actual movements you're doing. Ah.

41:23.37

christophknoll

So Biomechanics especially recently have really gotten out of hand. Ah,, there's you know some really good ah influencers out there that promote biomechanics but there's also a lot of influencers that promote it way too far and to the point where it's like. Like Athletele X is an example of this I don't like Athlete X Personally I liked him in the beginning when he really started out but he's he's been all around for so Long. He's contradicted himself So many times. Oh This is good for this. This is actually bad now. But it's actually good again. But then then it's Bad. It's like you you. Put out this content about different ways to lift for so long Eventually, you get to the point where you start contradicting yourself and that's my problem with it is. It's like if you're going to believe in something you're going to read these scientific studies based off of whether or not tricep rope pushdowns are good for your elbows or something For instance. Your conclusion is going to be derived from these scientific studies and when it comes to the human body especially when it comes to like joints and actual movements not like hormonal reactions to things like actual moving moving the body almost never will things change. Like you know Skull Crush is being harder on your elbows. That's a fact that is black and white. That's not going to change one day. It's not going be like oh all of a sudden The human body can now handle skull crushes with their elbows. No, it's always going to be kind of hard on your elbows. It's never going to change so to be like oh upright rows are bad for your wrists and elbows. But then like.

42:52.95

christophknoll

A year later be like oh it's the Bestel Exercise you could do. You should do it more like it just ah to me. That's what's annoying and all of these guys are like oh this is what's biomechanically ideal. It's like the fucking wonkiestt movement ever. You're getting into the cable machine and you're all twisted and sideways and you like do this shit and like it's just were it's stupid. Because it's like dude you're you're now compromising like other joints just to optimize your triceps like it just it just to me. It's kind of backwards thinking a little bit. Um and you're trashing on like a lot of these guys are trashing on the most used movements ever. Like tricep wrote pushdowns are like oh it's no a do for your triceps because Xy and z and it's like okay so that's ah every single fucking Mr Olympia who's ever used them which is all of them like every single bodybuilder has used rope push downs to build a triceps and all of them will say it's one of the best movements can do so. Where you getting in your information as far as bodybuilding goes that it's bad for you like yeah, it might be bad in your wristst or something like that. But it's not to the point where like you're going to need surgery like bench press is so much more dangerous than something like tricep row pushdowns but y'all ain't talking about that shit are like squats. You're putting five hundred fucking pounds in your back and you're going to say that's ideal for your joints. No, it's not but it fucking glow grows your glutes. You know? So it's this is just how things work and bio mechanics like I said is just getting out of hand and it's just getting way to the point where everybody's just trying to lift biomechanically and scienceba and they're trying to.

44:25.80

christophknoll

You know and just it's it's frustrating to me. It's like it's like those guys um, okay like ah think his name is vegan Gaines I I haven't watched him in years I haven't I never liked his content but I haven't seen anything about him in years. He hasn't not been relevant. Um I think he. People were talking about again because he was trashing on some sort of bodybuil there that died who was it was it George Peterson I forget who it was he tried to become relevant again by trashing on some bodybuilder some for some bullshit reasons's like oh if you because you're eating animal meat and you're not eating vegan food and but but so. I hate that guy the way he trains because the way he trains is he does full body workouts every two days because he's like oh your body recovers over a 48 hour period so after 48 hours you're back ready to train full body again. It's not necessarily how it works. Yeah, it takes 48 hours hypothetically for your muscles to recover. But. Doesn't necessarily mean you're going to be getting effective workouts by doing full body workouts every single time you work out. You know you're not going to be hitting every single muscle head. You're not going to be hitting all the fibers. You're not going to be hitting you know anything you need to be working on extra. You know it's not like I can hit my front my short long of my biasps trice every single delt head all 3 delt heads. You know my external myer head of my pec my clavicle head you know all the different muscles in your back your romboids you know your terrace made minor your lats you're also gonna be hitting your glutes all 3 heads in your quads 2 heads in your handss your calves your forearms you're going to be hitting all of that in one workout. Dude you be there for like six fucking hours

46:00.47

christophknoll

And you're going to get return on. You're you're going to get very bad. Very bad return on your time as far as return on investment. It's just not worth the time and you're just you're going to be wasting your energy and you're not going to have any energy towards like not even halfway done so it just that's not an effective way of lifting. And giving your body a week to recover from something is generally pretty good I do two arm days because I am able to space them out by like four days roughly each but like chest or back given my back a whole week to recover or my legs a whole week to recover to recover is generally much more effective than going. one day then two days later then two days later and so on and so forth, especially with legs I mean I'm sore sometimes for like four days so why would I go back to the gym on my second day when I'm still sore and is usually the worst day of soreness is two days after and lift again. It's just kind of backwards thinking and. You know I know that's not as as common as it is anymore. But this is where bio mechanics is kind of going. It's kind of going like in the extreme side of things and you know people are starting to try to lift as biomechanically as possible and you know it's first learn form guys. Learn form. Learn the proper weights and then kind of go from there. Um, you know lift whatever is healthy for you. Don't lift up and that's too taxing you shoulders and if it is too taxing then stop if your shoulders killing you stop lifting or just stop doing anything that's going to be taxing on that shoulder because you're just going to injure yourself. You know that happened to be the other day I was doing chess day and.

47:31.14

christophknoll

Ah, my shoulders were killing me so I fucking stopped because what's the point. Why would I risk an injury doing more chest workouts when or do more chest and chest movements when I could just stop call it a day and recover my shoulder so it's just not worth it and. Um, mechanics you know, just because it's ideal for Xy and z doesn't necessarily mean you're going to be building the most off of it. You know, um I think that you should base it off of we've always said this base it off of your results. You know if this is what's going to be if you're resulting in something good from x movement then keep doing that just because it's not. X movement isn't best biomechanically it doesn't mean y movement is going to result in any more better muscles really? So do whatever your body responds to the best and that's really the message of this entireession today. Just do what your body does best take influence. From certain things like saroplasmic hypertrophy take influence from that see results from that and then kind of go from there Kai Green didn't result the best from it so he did 20 reps for however, many sets and got much better results. Ah so just keep doing that and just base it off of how your body responds and. You'll you'll go a long way that way you don't have to do it a certain way just because you know somebody said that that's what's ideal. You know you might be influenced by them. Okay, maybe I'll give this a try That's what I've done. Oh I give this a try see what it goes I tried it once? Um, it's not for me moving on doing something else.

49:01.28

christophknoll

So but but so like Ben Yain's good example. He's very biomechanically focused and you know it's either I agree with him wholeheartedly on something or completely 100 % disagree with him I don't agree or disagree on all of his content. It's kind of mixed but when it comes to triceps. That's another thing there is movements that he does. That I completely disagree with and I've tried and I'm like this is so fucking wasting my time but then there's other movements that he does that I'm fucking all on board for you know he he recently had a video about cross-body tricep extensions and using it on a cable machine and you just you just stand to the side. Kind of put your arm out so that you're kind of giving yourself enough space and then you just pull down the cable from there and that's biomechanically ideal and for me I respond very very well from that movement and so I keep doing it I've been doing it for a couple months now and he did just post this video about it. But I've been doing that movement for a couple months and I'll keep doing it. You know just because I know I'm getting good results from it. So why would you do something that doesn't give you good results just because somebody says that it gives them good results. You wouldn't so don't do it that way because of somebody else. Um, but with that being said and that was a little short of an hour but I think we'm going to cut this session down to about 50 minutes ah if you guys have any questions or anything please email us. We're still trying to figure out the issues with the hgh at hhcast.com. But in the meantime hghpodcast one at Gmail.com is our current email. Um, you can also leave comments on our website which is hghcast dot com so leave comments on there like.

50:35.40

christophknoll

On there as well. We got our Youtube up now a hall of gameen tonight purchasey podcast on Youtube ah, which we might trim down the name of that. Actually it is a pretty long name we might trim that down. But ah, we're going to be having our all of our podcast sessions on Youtube as well. So go on there leave likes comment subscribe all of that. Ah, you know we we do this for fun me Andris do this for fun whether or not you guys want to listen to it is up to you and we hope that you guys can pull some knowledge from this. We just like to have an outlet. We just like to be able to talk and talk about anything new. We've learned you know have different topics to talk about because there's not many people that we do get to talk about their stuff too. Especially for 2 hours straight ah so you know this is something that's very good for us. It mean Christoph are very extroverted. Ah so it allows us to have this outlet just to get all this stuff off our chest. So with that being said, um, you guys enjoy your day keep training. I keep doing what your body responds to well, especially food and training keep that up keep grinding keep lifting hard going to the gym every single day because if you don't go into the gym your competition did so keep going keep lifting. You can do it do your cardio if you have it. And your plan but with that being said, enjoy your guys' day because have any questions reach out and guys want us to address anything. Let us know but take it easy guys.


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